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Aughts

The Encyclopedia of Counterintuitive Thought

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Ralph Bellamy’s characters were good people.
2008, Magazine.

Bellamy was always the boring heel in screwball comedies (and always engaged to a woman who obviously needed to end up back with Cary Grant). But, unlike in modern romantic comedies, where the heroine leaves a cad for a good guy, Bellamy was usually playing a decent and good man who’d be better off without the heroine. (This is contrary to Pauline Kael, who dismissed him as the original “square.”)
MARK LOTTO, “IN PRAISE OF RALPH BELLAMY,” THE NEW YORK OBSERVER, OCTOBER 2.

Selling obscure things is better than selling popular things.
2006, Book.
As Amazon’s success indicates, blockbusters are less profitable than a deep catalogue of beloved obscurities.
CHRIS ANDERSON, THE LONG TAIL: WHY THE FUTURE OF BUSINESS IS SELLING LESS OF MORE.

Successful companies cannot be imitated.
2007, Book.
It’s almost impossible to imitate the success of successful companies because it’s too tough to distinguish the traits that make a company successful from the ones that didn’t contribute to, or that may have even impeded, that success.
PHIL ROSENZWEIG, THE HALO EFFECT … AND THE EIGHT OTHER BUSINESS DELUSIONS THAT DECEIVE MANAGERS.

Watching TV and playing video games make kids smarter.
2005, Book.
Modern video games (which involve complex problem-solving) and increasingly complicated television shows improve children’s critical thinking skills.
STEVEN JOHNSON, EVERYTHING BAD IS GOOD FOR YOU: HOW TODAY’S POPULAR CULTURE IS ACTUALLY MAKING US SMARTER.


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