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Miranda July

Age: 36.
Film: The Future.
The Hipster Auteur: July’s follow-up to the 2005 sensation Me and You and Everyone We Know won near-unanimous acclaim and served as an excellent refutation of the sophomore slump.
Film’s Status: Bought by Roadside Attractions

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Ezra Miller

Age: 18.
Film: Another Happy Day.
The Big Surprise: “Who’s the kid who played the druggie?” He’s a recurring guest on TV’s Royal Pains, and between his funny, poignant performance here and a starring role in the upcoming We Need to Talk About Kevin, opposite Tilda Swinton, everyone will know Miller soon.
Film’s Status: On the market.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Felicity Jones

Age: 27.
Film: Like Crazy.
This Year’s Carey Mulligan: The British actress and Oxford grad announced herself in a big way with the romantic drama Like Crazy. For the film, she and co-star Anton Yelchin—playing a long-distance couple yearning to connect—improvised nearly all of their dialogue.
Film’s Status: Bought by Paramount.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Michael Shannon

Age: 36.
Film: Take Shelter.
The Next Philip Seymour Hoffman: Like Hoffman, Shannon’s an Oscar-nominated Sundance vet who’s worked his way up via indie films. His thrilling intensity—as seen on HBO’s Boardwalk Empire—is profoundly disturbing in Take Shelter, in which he plays an ordinary man driven to madness by apocalyptic visions.
Film’s Status: Bought by Sony Pictures Classics.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Brit Marling

Age: 27.
Films: Another Earth,Sound of My Voice.
The Thinking Man’s Ingenue: She’s had festival success before as co-director of the 2005 documentary Boxers and Ballerinas. This time she not only co-wrote two features; she stars in them, too. Guess that makes her a double-double threat.
Films’ Statuses: Earth bought by Fox Searchlight; Voice on the market.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Kate Bosworth

Age: 28.
Films at Sundance: Another Happy Day, Little Birds.
The Comeback Kid: She was the next big thing after the 2002 surfer flick Blue Crush—a promise wiped out by a slew of flops. But as a troubled woman with an estranged father in the black comedy Another Happy Day, the actress may have caught another wave.
Films’ Statuses: Both films on the market.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Rutger Hauer

Age: 67.
Films: Hobo With a Shotgun,The Mill & the Cross.
Return Of The Maniac: The Blade Runner star reclaims his deranged badass rep with a hobo-vigilante movie. The senior citizen insisted on doing the more disgusting stunts himself, like flinging himself from a roof onto a pile of garbage.
Films’ Statuses: Hobo bought by Magnet Releasing; Mill on the market.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

John Hawkes

Age: 51.
Films: Martha Marcy May Marlene, Higher Ground.
The Oscar Nominee: If there were assists in film, like in basketball, Hawkes would be the Steve Nash of Sundance: In last year’s Winter’s Bone, he brought out the best in fellow nominee Jennifer Lawrence. This year, he’s a deeply creepy cult leader opposite festival breakout Elizabeth Olsen.
Films’ Statuses: Martha bought by Fox Searchlight; Ground on the market.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Vera Farmiga

Age: 37
Film: Higher Ground.
The Actress Who Wanted to Direct: The pregnant Farmiga makes a strong debut with a religious drama, in which she also stars. “We did preproduction in my first trimester, production in my second, and post in the third. There were a lot of things gestating and being born.”
Film’s Status: On the market.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Paul Giamatti

Age: 43.
Film: Win Win.
The Regular: The Sundance regular has hit three of the last four festivals. This time, he’s in fellow vet Tom McCarthy’s drama (co-starring Amy Ryan), playing a dissipated attorney who wades deep into the very strange world of high-school wrestling in suburban New Jersey.
Film’s Status: A Fox Searchlight release on March 18.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Dominic Cooper

Age: 32.
Film: The Devil’s Double.
The Knockout Twofer: Cooper (memorable in An Education and The History Boys) rips into his biggest role yet, playing Saddam Hussein’s sadistic son Uday and the decent man forced to be his body double. The gritty, torture-filled true story rides on his brilliant turn.
Film’s Status: Bought by Lionsgate.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Adepero Oduye

Age: 33.
Film: Pariah.
Brooklyn’s Own: The Sunset Park–raised Oduye was doing theater in New Haven and had done bit parts on TV when she landed this lead role. Her deeply affecting performance turns the shyness of a lesbian teen struggling to come out to her parents into a quiet power.
Film’s Status: On the market Update: Bought by Focus Features.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Paul Rudd

Age: 41.
Film: My Idiot Brother.
The Beard: In this sweetest of comedies, Rudd is irresistible playing a bearded hippie brother housed by his uptight sisters (Elizabeth Banks, Zooey Deschanel). The only downside for Rudd? Shooting during a brutal New York summer: “Not good beard weather.”
Film’s Status: Bought by the Weinstein Company.

Photo: Henny Garfunkel

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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