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A little snacky, a little seasonal, and a lot of glorified grandma.

Little Oyster Sandwiches

The Dutch serves New York’s quintessential bivalve on the half-shell, in massive shellfish platters, and fried and tucked into house-baked buns with pickled-okra sauce.

Photo: Danny Kim

Chicken Paprikás

Just like your Yorkville grandma used to make, if she made hers with hot, sweet, and smoked paprika and chicken that was variously braised, roasted, and smoked.

Photo: Danny Kim

Egg Okonomiyaki

The Japanese savory pancake, Dutchified with house-smoked pork belly and bonito flakes shaved to order.

Photo: Danny Kim

Apple-Rhubarb-Rose Pie

As American as apple pie, aromatized with Lebanese rosewater.

Photo: Danny Kim

Stuffed Trout

Is there anything more American than wrapping something in bacon? Well, there’s stuffing with corn bread and then wrapping with bacon, as Carmellini does to this trout.

Photo: Danny Kim

Devil’s-Food Cake

It’s finished with black-pepper boiled icing and served with White Russian ice cream.

Photo: Danny Kim

Corn Bread

Pastry chef Kierin Baldwin bakes almost everything in-house, including corn bread served in lieu of a bread basket.

Photo: Danny Kim

Dressed Crab, Bloody Mary, Green Goddess

A crab dish inspired by a classic cocktail and a classic dressing, both invented in the twenties.

Photo: Danny Kim

Housemade Hot Sauce (Left)

Comes in handy for barrio tripe.

Housemade Steak Sauce

Dry-aged bone-in New York strip and beef-rib chop for two, served separately.

Photo: Danny Kim

Dutch Baby, Lemon Marmalade

The dish that gives fallen soufflés a good name.

Photo: Danny Kim

Barroom

Oak tables, custom light fixtures, and vintage Friso Kramer chairs.

Photo: Danny Kim

Barroom

Elevated corner table.

Photo: Danny Kim

Bar by Night (Open to 2 a.m.)

Counter space by day, for takeout breakfast pastries and lunch sandwiches.

Photo: Danny Kim

The Oyster Room

The focal point is this simple wood bar, with swivel stools bolted into the floor.

Photo: Melissa Hom

The passageway from the oyster room to the dining room is equipped with temperature-controlled wine cabinets.

Photo: Melissa Hom

Dining Room

The clubby back dining room has leather booths, a working fireplace, and schoolhouse chairs.

Photo: Melissa Hom

A little snacky, a little seasonal, and a lot of glorified grandma.

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

A little snacky, a little seasonal, and a lot of glorified grandma.

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

A little snacky, a little seasonal, and a lot of glorified grandma.

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

A little snacky, a little seasonal, and a lot of glorified grandma.

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim
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