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Godspell (1971)
Stephen Nathan

In striped bell bottoms and clown makeup, Nathan established the durable image of Jesus as a happy hippie. He ended up in a scattering of small-screen work, then shifted to work in TV production.

Photo: © Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations

Jesus Christ Superstar (1971)
Jeff Fenholt and Ted Neeley

Fenholt made Time’s cover but developed a drug problem during the run. (He later got clean and landed on Christian TV.) His understudy Neeley starred in the film—and as of 2010 was still touring in the role, arriving in each city on foot, as He did.

Photo: John Olson/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images; Ron Wolfson/WireImage/Getty Images

Corpus Christi (1998)
Anson Mount

In Terrence McNally’s award-winning play about a gay modern-day Jesus who marries two apostles to one another, Mount received good notices; since then, he’s done mostly film and TV, as well as Classic Stage Company’s recent Three Sisters.

Photo: Joan Marcus

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot (2005)
John Ortiz

Ortiz, coming off his run in Anna in the Tropics, made an intense cameo in Stephen Adly Guirgis’s courtroom seriocomedy. Probably the most successful Savior: He’s co-artistic director of the LAByrinth Theater Company.

Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times/Redux

Passion Play (2010)
Hale Appleman

Meta-Jesus: Appleman played actors from three different eras in the Easter spectacle’s lead role, to good reviews, in a small Brooklyn production pegged to Ruhl’s Broadway debut with In the Next Room.

Photo: Carol Rosegg

Godspell (2011)
Hunter Parrish

The actor best known for his role on Weeds starred in Spring Awakening before it closed, but this is his first time opening a show. Can Parrish break the streak?

Photo: Jeremy Daniel

Indie Actress

(500) Days of Summer

Photo: Fox Searchlight/Everett Collection

Indie Actress

Your Highness

Photo: Courtesy of Universal Studios

Indie Musician

With M. Ward, Her Partner in the Band She & Him

Photo: David Atlas/Retna

Indie Spouse

With Ben Gibbard, Her Partner in Life

Photo: Charley Gallay/WireImage

Indie TV Star?

New Girl

Photo: Isabella Vosmikova/Courtesy of FOX

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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