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What’s Worth Seeing When Broadway’s Dark?

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Tumbleweeds may be blowing through Shubert Alley, but for those intent on catching a show, all is not lost. Beyond two worthy plays that have opened in midtown, Off Broadway and the few shows on Broadway just might remove the strike’s sting. And even if the shutdown has ended by the time you read this, they’re still worth your time and money. Try our substitution-specific game plan—and no matter where you go, head to Angus McIndoe, Joe Allen, or some other too-empty restaurant in the theater district for dinner.



If you intended to see: Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac, in which stage great Kevin Kline chastely romances Broadway novice Jennifer Garner…

You might consider: Shaw’s Pygmalion, in which Jefferson Mays refuses to romance Broadway novice Claire Danes—whose Eliza Doolittle will banish any regrets over missing Garner. You may have to buy from a ticket broker, but that’s true of Cyrano too.



If you intended to see: Rock ’n’ Roll, Tom Stoppard’s brilliant history play about Communism and pop music, featuring a charismatic performance by Rufus Sewell…

You might consider: The Overwhelming, J.T. Rogers’s drama about Americans during the Rwandan genocide of 1994, featuring a charismatic performance by Ron Cephas Jones.



If you intended to see: A Bronx Tale or The Color Purple, two stories about disadvantaged young people trying to establish themselves in the world…

You might consider: The Brothers Size, the gripping, lyrical drama in which Tarell Alvin McCraney fuses ritual with street slang to tell the story of a young man trying to keep his half-brother out of harm’s way.



If you intended to see: Spring Awakening, Wicked, or any of the eighteen other musicals that use songs to make us laugh, think, or cry…

You might consider: Gone Missing, the Civilians’ funny, smart, and moving “documentary cabaret” about things lost and found. (The creators are friends of mine, so call me biased, but my colleagues’ raves may convince you it’s worth a look.)


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