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Top Five Budget Cuts by New Stylists

Get a new look for next to nothing from these heavily supervised stylists-in-training.

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Training night at Bumble and bumble.  

Bumble and bumble.
415 W. 13th St., nr. Ninth Ave.; 212-521-6500
You have to attend a 20- to 45-minute model call before getting approved as a hair model here, but if you're accepted, the cut is free. The student-to-instructor ratio is roughly five to one, though every trainee is professionally licensed and touts a minimum of two years' experience. Clients have their choice of various cuts for the two-hour session, from the signature razor bob to the more traditional long-layered scissor cut.

Arrojo Studio
180 Varick St., nr. Charlton St.; 212-242-7786
Cuts with the salon's Advanced Education stylists on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings cost $20. Most stylists have at least one year of experience at other salons under their belts and undertake the training program to hone their cutting and coloring skills. Styles range from long, textured layers to precision razor cuts.

Sally Hershberger Downtown
425 W. 14th St., nr. Ninth Ave.; 212-206-8700
Training sessions take place at Hershberger's downtown outpost every Tuesday night, with cuts for $40, single-process color for $60, and highlights for $80. The apt students are Sally Hershberger assistants who have been paired with an experienced stylist during the day for observation and instruction. The stylists-in-training attend class each week, and many focus on fine-tuning already-developed cutting, coloring, and styling skills.

Sei Tomoko
240 E. 13th St., nr. Second Ave.; 212-533-6613
This sleekly designed salon (one of three New York outposts) hosts training sessions on Monday nights, offering a $10 cut for hair models. Though you may have to wait longer than at better-known stylist schools for a callback, the spot trumps larger chains for its personalized attention: Only one or two clients model each week—usually after-hours—and stylists-in-training are instructed and carefully monitored by co-owner and precision cutter Sei Kawamoto. Sessions typically last 90 minutes to two hours.

Aveda Institute
233 Spring St., nr. Sixth Ave.; 212-807-1492
Students at this well-known school for aspiring stylists start working on paying clients after about four months of training. Cuts are $20 and include the works: a half-hour consultation, wash, scalp massage, cut, blow-dry, and style. The instructor on duty checks in frequently and stylists-in-training are eager to please. Complex cuts can take up to three hours, so budget time wisely.


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