Proenza Schouler Shoots Too Early at Target

FASHION
• Proenza Schouler's Target line was available online for four hours yesterday (three days before its official debut), causing mass Internet shopper hysteria. [Fashionista]
• Snejana Onopka, one of the poster girls for the current Save the Models movement, is rumored to be skipping New York Fashion Week. [FlyPaper]
• Jordan Scott, former designer at Betsey Johnson and child of the East Village, will launch his first collection during Fashion Week. [British Vogue]

MEDIA
• Sundance buyers were unmoved by Graydon Carter's latest dalliance in movie producing, passing on the Brett Morgen–directed documentary, Chicago 10. [NYP]
• Having lost its beloved editor-in-chief to the hated New York Times, the L.A. Times riles up the troops with some journalistic smack talk: "We'll just go out and kick their ass," says D.C. bureau chief Doyle McManus. "We've done it before; we can do it again." [E&P]
• We doubt they teach this in business school: Time Inc. CEO Ann Moore says her company — fresh off another round of layoffs, by the way — actually hasn't been screwing up enough. [Forbes]

FINANCE
• World Bank president Paul Wolfowitz has holes in his socks. Must be a reminder of all that marching around he did for Donald Rumsfeld. [NYP]
• Smelling a recession, JP Morgan will no longer offer mortgage loans to people with bad credit. [AP via Crain's]
• Perhaps high on the publicity fumes from the Todd Thomson–Money Honey scandal, Citigroup says it's going help finance at least 45 Hollywood flicks in the next five years. [NYP]

LAW
• Milberg Weiss & Bershad got $37.7 million in fees for its work for Nortel — about a third of the $108 million it requested. The judge found the firm's bill "excessive." [Bloomberg via Law Blog/WSJ]
• Entry-level lawyers at big New York firms still out-earning their California colleagues. [The Recorder via Law.com]
• Governor Steamroller Spitzer set aside $111 million for a judicial pay raise in his 2007 budget. New York judges have now gone nine years without a hike in pay. [NYLJ via Law.com]