Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

intel

The ‘Portfolio’-ing: When You Premiere the Premier

20070416portfolio.jpg

It was no mere typo. There must have been a conscious decision to use "premier" to describe the first issue of Condé Nast Portfolio, which nearly all copy editors, this reporter included, would have called a "premiere." You don't make a mistake like that across the board — on the cover flap ("premier issue"), in the table of contents ("premier issue"), and, most telling, in the promotional letter ("premier issue debuts" [itals added to nauseate]). No, this one seems to be intentional, a style statement by the new publication. Perhaps the someday-to-be- monthly business magazine is indicating that what you hold in your hands is indeed the top of the line, that this is as good as it gets, it's the premier one, the most important, the preeminent, the top, the Colosseum, the best! For a premier issue to debut — well, it's spelled out right there. If they intended the correct "premiere" (which means first, debut), they wouldn't have coupled it with "debut." So they must mean what they say. This is the premier, not the premiere; the best issue you're gonna get. Take it as it is. —Carl Rosen

0