Pat Kiernan Is Saving Up for a Slurpee Machine

Name: Pat Kiernan

Age: 38

Job: Morning anchor, NY1 News and (as of July 9) host of VH1's World Series of Pop Culture.

Neighborhood: Upper West Side

Who's your favorite New Yorker, living or dead, real or fictional?
Peter Jennings. He made it seem so easy.

What's the best meal you've eaten in New York?
My "best meals" tend to be associated with the circumstances as much as the food. Before Dawn and I had kids, we would travel far from home to queue up to sit in the garden at the old Miracle Grill on First Avenue. They didn't take reservations, and we would sit in the bar for an hour or two sometimes to get a table. The food was great, and the setting was magical. (It's called Imagine now, and I haven't been to check it out.)

In one sentence, what do you actually do all day in your job?
I arrive at the office at 4 a.m., try to figure out what the people of New York want (or need) to know when they wake up, and then tell them.

Where do you get your coffee?
I don't drink coffee. Sometimes I'll indulge in a morning Coca-Cola, though.

What's the last thing you saw on Broadway?
Frost/Nixon. We had heard the reviews from London and saw it early.

Do you give money to panhandlers?
Straight-up panhandlers don't fare well with me. On the other hand, subway musicians often get a donation. I have a strict policy that if I'm on a platform with a musician for more than two songs, then I've accepted sufficient entertainment that I'm required to pay. Further, if at any point I find myself singing along or subconsciously tapping a toe, I'm required to donate even if they didn't reach the two-song minimum.

What's your drink?
The Slurpee. It's easier to get one in Manhattan than it used to be, but I still long for the day when I have my own Slurpee machine.

How often do you prepare your own meals?
I'm with our kids most days around suppertime, so I'm preparing uncomplicated meals for all of us. The grill on our terrace is a favorite at this time of year.

What's your favorite medication?
Cold FX. Canadians swear it fights away the common cold. I haven't entirely made up my mind but have bought in to the point that I take it when I'm feeling run-down.

What's hanging above your sofa?
The giant television "color bars" I painted about fifteen years ago.

How much is too much to spend on a haircut?
$20. This doesn't mean that I don't spend more than $20, it just means I think I spend too much. I also think lunch shouldn't cost more than $5.

When's bedtime?
Noon. And then again at 10:30 p.m. I have a long nap in the afternoon so I don't have to go to bed at eight.

Brunch: pro or con?
Con. You eat more than you intended to. You never accomplish anything before brunch. And you don't feel very ambitious afterward. Wastes half of the day.

What's your thread count?
I haven't a clue. Shall I forward to my wife?

What do you hate most about living in New York?
It's too far from family. Air Canada's nonstop flight to Calgary is great, but it's still a long day by the time you get to the airport and deal with security.

What's your brand of jeans?
Tends to vary each time I buy, but the last two pairs were John Varvatos USA.

When's the last time you drove a car?
I'm in our car most weekends for one reason or another. To try to justify the expense of parking the car, I feel obligated to drive to Costco regularly to try to save money.

Who should be the next president?
The candidate with the majority of electoral votes. Sorry — but that's about all you're going to get from me on that one.

Times, Post, or Daily News?
All three. Plus another half-dozen papers that I review for my daily "In the Papers" segment on NY1.

Yankees or Mets?
A narrow win for the Yankees. I moved to New York in 1996, and it's been fun to be here to see the success of the Yankees. You can't help but be drawn in by that. Still, there's no childhood association with either team, so if the Mets keep up their winning ways, I could be won over.

What makes someone a New Yorker?
Being a New Yorker is about a love of the city more than it is about where you were born. A New Yorker is someone who understands and embraces the city. You've got to appreciate the opportunities New York offers. You've got to be willing and able to overcome some of the challenges of living here and brush off the others. And you've got to have pride about the fact that every other city in the world wants to be — at least a little — like New York.