It’s Official: Rush Limbaugh Will Never Shut Up

Rush Limbaugh
Photo: Getty Images

MEDIA

• Do you know how much money Rush Limbaugh makes? Are you sure you want to? Also: "I'm not retiring until every American agrees with me." [Reuters/NYT]

• The Washington Post is expected to announce their new editor next week. (Jeff Bercovici thinks its Marcus Brauchli.) [Politico]

• Charlie Gasparino got all up in arms about Bryan Burroughs's Vanity Fair piece on Bear Stearns, which implies CNBC fearmongering was a factor in the firm's fall, saying the writer "failed Journalism 101." [Dealbreaker]

• The L.A. Times will cut 150 jobs. [NYO]

FINANCE
• Standing on a street corner with a sign saying "Experienced MIT Grad for Hire" is actually not a great way to get a job, Josh Perksy, who made international news when did that very thing at 50th Street and Park Avenue a few weeks ago, has found. But, he says, "I am big in Korea." [DealBook/NYT]
• Carl Icahn is not failing to make Yahoo do his bidding: His own house is in disarray. His $7.9 billion hedge fund had its largest loss yet between October and April, when it dropped by 7 percent. [Bloomberg]
• Henry Paulsen admits that the regulatory system could have "performed better." [BBC]

REAL ESTATE
• Veronica Hearst closed on two apartments at 4 East 66th Street for $36.5 million. [NYP]
• Jill Zarin's favorite things in her Hamptons house include her Pilates machine, Steinway piano, and Viking range. Also, there's a photo gallery! [NYP]
• Cantilevers—bits of building that bulge out into space—are making a comeback, says a guy. [NYS]

LAW
• The imminent energy boom means real-estate lawyers need to start boning up on oil and gas law. [NYT]
• In 2008, "flat is the new up," as far as the market for law firms goes. [LawBlog/WSJ]
• Judge Fredric Block, the Brooklyn native who's in charge of the case against Bear Stearns hedge fund managers Ralph Cioffi and Matthew Tanning, is "a colorful and down-to-earth jurist who frequently speaks his mind." He co-wrote an off-Broadway musical in the eighties, as well as several unpublished country-music songs. Judge Block frequently relies on humor in his courtroom. During a racially charged trial in 1991, he asked a black witness to define the word "'chillin',' for somebody who is not a brother." [WSJ]