Lydia Hearst Is a Journalist

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Photo: Bazaar

At first we laughed when we saw Lydia Hearst-Shaw being touted as a "journalist" in a Max Studio ad that appears in Bazaar, the magazine founded by her great-grandfather, William Randolph, this month. But we suppose it's not totally untrue. Lydia's "Page Six" magazine column is not journalism. But it is, in many ways, derivative of Tom Wolfe's New Journalism, combining as it does a subjective tone with reportage. Take this week's column, in which Lydia's shoe-leather investigative work yields news of previously unknown skin cream Egyptian Magic:

I heard about it from Michelle Trachtenberg, who got it from someone who used to do Madonna’s makeup.

Like renowned critic Robert Christgau, Lydia's music reviews are packed with first-person references and allusions to popular culture.

I am very close with Cisco, Shwayze and their manager, Warren Gumpel. We even have matching skeleton key tattoos. But since they record in Malibu, we don’t get to see each other often enough. In any case, I am really proud of them. Their song “Buzzin’ ” is all over the radio right now and it’s perfect for blasting in your car…


But most often, Lydia's work resembles that of the late Hunter S. Thompson, in that she is usually the central figure of her stories.

Danity Kane singer Aubrey O’Day is a good friend of mine — especially since our “scandalous” shared kiss on August 6 for the short film promoting Tara Subkoff’s Bebe diffusion line (shoppers will be able to see it in stores after its premiere at the Norwood club in NYC on September 4). It was amusing how the paparazzi thought it was real and chased our car from Butter to Bungalow 8. We didn’t even use our tongues or swap spit.


See that? Cultural commentary, wrapped in a first-person narrative. And without the drugs, we're sure! The only question is, what do we call this new genre, as spearheaded by young Lydia? Nouveau Journalism? Is Julia Allison one? Discuss.

The Hearst Chronicles [Page Six]