Who Should Be the Next Jets Coach?

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Clockwise from top left: Cowher, Holmgren, Spagnuolo, and Schottenheimer
Clockwise from top left: Cowher, Holmgren, Spagnuolo, and Schottenheimer Photo: Getty Images

The Jets have been without a coach for a bit over 24 hours, which is more than enough time for the rumor mill to get going, full force. But do any of the names being mentioned as a replacement for Eric Mangini really make sense for the Jets? A breakdown, after the jump.

Bill Cowher
Landing the biggest name available would go a long way toward making fans forget the 2008 season. Cowher has a Super Bowl ring and a consistent history of winning.
On the other hand: He’s already told the Browns he’s not interested in coaching next year, and he's apparently told the Jets he's not interested in the job if he can't bring in his own personnel director. (GM Mike Tannenbaum isn't likely to be going anywhere.) The thinking was that he might take the Jets job if they offered enough salary, but if that's the case, do you really want a coach taking a job solely because of the money?

Mike Holmgren
He’s well liked, has (famously) never been fired — and he’s taken both teams he coached to a Super Bowl. He won one of those with Brett Favre, so signing him might entice the quarterback to return.
On the other hand: Signing him might entice Brett Favre to return.

Marty Schottenheimer
Sure, his playoff record is terrible, but losing in the first round every year would technically be an improvement. His son, Brian, is the Jets offensive coordinator, and he could bring in his brother Kurt as defensive coordinator. It’s nepotism at its finest!
On the other hand: His reputation as a choker isn’t exactly the message you want to be sending to fans right now.

Steve Spagnuolo
For the second year in a row, the Giants’ defensive coordinator will be a hot name for coaching vacancies. The Big Blue defense has been outstanding in his two seasons: They’ve won a Super Bowl and go into these playoffs as the NFC's top seed. He’d be the head coach of the Redskins today, if the Giants hadn’t made him the highest-paid defensive coordinator in football.
On the other hand: He’s never been a head coach, and even his coordinator experience is limited. Haven’t we been down this road before?