Newspapers Become Blogs Become Newspapers Again

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Today in the media world, web went print, shelter mags moved, and newspapers turned tabloid. The media's hanging in there, after the jump.

• Print is so passé that it's already coming back again! In the form of The Printed Blog, a twice-daily, free newspaper aggregating city-specific blog posts and printing them onto a real page. The paper is launching soon in Chicago, San Francisco, and New York. [Wired]

• Print that still sells? Anything Obama-related. Last year's New Yorker cover featuring an “O” moon sold the third-most copies of the magazine ever. Now Time "record highs" for this year’s Person of the Year issue (it even beat you!). The Washington Post wants in on the action as well, planning to sell nearly two million newspapers in two days for Obama’s inauguration. [Romenesko]

• Los Angeles Times editor Russ Stanton claims that the L.A. Times’ website garners enough revenue to cover the paper's online and editorial payroll. Today, media pundit Jeff Jarvis sees this as hope for "the possibility that online revenue could support digital journalism for a city." But the internet already disagrees, as is its habit. [Valleywag]

ReadyMade, a Meredith Corp.–owned DIY-for-comfortable-homeowners magazine, is moving from its home city of Berkeley, California, to its corporate headquarters in the less sunny Des Moines. But its editorial staffers are not moving with it. [Mixed Media/Portfolio]

• The Star Telegram and the Dallas Morning News are teaming up on Texas sports coverage, with the Telegram tackling the Rangers and the News covering the Cowboys, then sharing their stories with one another. [Star-Telegram]

Country Weekly is dropping its subscribers, which is weird because we had no idea people bought Country Weekly at the newsstand. [Mediaworks/Ad Age]

• The Chicago Tribune, a key component of Sam Zell’s bankrupt newspaper conglomerate, is reshaping itself into a tabloid-size and -style paper (at newsstands, that is; subscribers will still receive the same size paper). The change became official today in a memo to staffers, the subject of which was actually "Tribune — now in a convenient carry-on size." [Chicago Tribune]