Lydia Hearst Calls for an End to the Cycle of Blame

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Photo: Patrick McMullan

For well over a year now the economy has been in terrible decline. Last week, unemployment in the U.S. reached 9.5 percent, surpassing analysts' expectations and causing the the vice-president to admit the administration "misread ... how bad an economy we inherited" (emphasis ours). On any given day, the world's brightest economic minds can be found harshing each other on the Internet, or issuing blistering commentary from the safety of their paper caves, prompting us, the citizenry, to pitifully ask ourselves: Wait, what the hell is going on? Who is in charge here? Who, if anyone, will lead us back from the darkness and into the light?

At last, it seems, there is such a person. A figure willing to stand up to say "Enough is enough; stop the vicious cycle of blame!"

Lydia tells Social Life magazine:


Obviously this is the worst financial crisis this country has seen since the 1930's. I think it's human nature to want to point a finger and blame someone for what has happened. But, in this case it is hard to do. Do you blame the government for relaxing lending standards and encouraging every American to own a home? Do you the banks for creating such outrageous mortgage products to take advantage of the economic environment? Do you blame the individuals and families who followed these incentives to borrow beyond their means? Is Wall Street to blame for pushing our financial system to the brink, or are regulators at fault for not reading the signals all along?

Pointing a finger can often be fruitless and ignores the human aspect of this crisis. Blame only gets you so far. People's lives have been ruined. Jobs have been lost, homes have been seized, college funds and retirements have been destroyed. I'm interested more in what can we do to fix the issues on hand.

As Vaclav Havel's famous 1990 inauguration speech, in which he declared "None of us is victim, we are all co-creators," ushered the Czech people into a new era of moral responsibility, so we hope Lydia's words, as recorded by Social Life, will inspire Americans to bloodlessly revolt against the small-minded finger-pointing our government has in fact encouraged. Call it the Lingerie Revolution.

And also?


SL: Do you have any pet peeves?

LH: People who talk with their mouth full, it's like "raised by wolves." Bad table manners are just something that I find inexcusable. In fact, bad manners, period. What ever happened to people saying "Please, Thank you, and Excuse me?"

Right? Viva Lydia!

[Via Cityfile]