Goldman Sachs Charged With Abandoning Loves Kittens

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Photo: Crumley's Flickr

Goldman Sachs has more than $600 million socked away in its charitable foundation, much of which the company will dole out this year to atone for the sin of making too much money. Let's hope they'll spare some for the kittens — the five kittens they said they'd take care of and then abandoned*, according to a recent editorial in The Villager:

[T]he firm has not yet paid a few thousand dollars of vet bills for the five kittens born in its headquarters building nearing completion in Battery Park City. In August, after our sister publication Downtown Express reported the kittens’ discovery, Goldman offered to pay the bills and encourage its employees to adopt the “BlackBerries.”


Ha, that's cute. Because they're like gadgets. Living gadgets.


The paper gives them the company benefit of the doubt:

It may be just a matter of Goldman waiting to get the vet invoices — we can’t imagine they’d stiff kittens while writing out bonus checks worth $23 billion — but the cats still need adoptive homes.


Blankfein! We're dismayed. What would God say?

Update*: A Goldman spokesman tells the FT the bills have been paid, homes have been found, and "They are now the luckiest kittens in Manhattan."

Update 2: Goldman is apparently taking these allegations extremely seriously as another spokesperson from the company emailed us to elaborate: "To be clear, we never abandoned the kittens. Every kitten has been adopted. The vet bills were requested several times and they were paid as soon as we received them. The Downtown Express reported the story inaccurately." The Downtown Express has not returned Intel's call for comment.

Update 3: Downtown Express editor Josh Rogers, who wants you to know he never got our voicemail, responds: "At the time of our editorial, which was published in Downtown Express and The Villager, none of the kittens had been adopted and the vet bills had not yet been paid. After the editorial, the Brotmans were quickly able to find homes. Two of the three people who adopted the kittens said they learned about the cats through our coverage. We are proud of whatever role we played in finding homes for the kittens." There's now an update on their site.

Let us apologize for Goldman Sachs [Villager via FT/Alphaville]