Gail Huff’s Curious Hand Is Making Life Difficult for Digney Fignus

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Over 25 years ago, the director for Digney Fignus's "The Girl With the Curious Hand" video hired a particular model-actress to play the sexy assassin primarily because she fit into the red dress they had already chosen. As has recently been rediscovered by the Internet, that woman, Boston newswoman Gail Huff, is now the wife of newly elected Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown. The revelation has brought a burst of attention to both the video — which includes a scene in which Huff brings a bottle of suntan lotion to climax — and Fignus, who's still recording to this day (and playing shows every Monday this February at Googie's Lounge in New York). "It’s so funny, this thing is coming up now, and it’s 25 years old," Fignus tells us. "It's been mildly amusing up until this morning."

Ah yes, this morning. That's when Fignus received a perplexing e-mail from a church he's playing a gig for. Well, was playing a gig for. “So many angry phone calls regarding your YouTube video featuring Gail Huff," he reads from the e-mail, "and most importantly, the comments that are noted by people when you scroll down to the bottom of the page. I’m really sorry about this." That's right — it's not just the decades-old video that offends people, it's the comments that Fignus has no control over. We at Daily Intel can sympathize. If we were held responsible for everything our commenters wrote, well ... we'd probably have been disowned by our family by now, and maybe imprisoned. "It's like, wow, are we still burning witches up here?" Fignus says. "What’s going on?"

Fignus, who isn't the least bit political and didn't vote in the special election, is simply astounded that anyone actually cares this much. "What the hell does it have to do with Scott's, her husband’s, ability to govern?" he asks. "And I mean, he gets nude in Cosmo anyway, what the heck are they worried about Gail?" Besides, as he's been telling people, "this is not really a song about Gail, folks, hello?" In fact, it's actually all a nautically themed double entendre, Fignus says. The "girl" is the ship, and the "curious hand" is a member of the crew. The point was to "make people think one thing but have it really be about another thing," Fignus says. "Guess that bit my ass, huh?"