So, What’s Happening With Immigration Reform?

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Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A group of Senate Democrats introduced an outline for immigration reform last night — in a nutshell: increased border security, eight-year path to legalization, high-tech Social Security I.D. cards — but if you want to know when change is coming, here's your answer: It's either definitely happening this year, definitely not happening this year, or maybe happening this year.

"I know there may not be an appetite immediately to dive into another controversial issue .... I don't want us to do something just for the sake of politics that doesn't solve the problem." —An urgency-lacking President Obama on Wednesday night.

"The legislation would have to begin in the Senate .... If there is going to be any movement in this regard, it will require presidential leadership." —A totally uninterested-sounding Nancy Pelosi yesterday.

"In the past several weeks, pundits and columnists, reporters have almost all been saying the prospects for comprehensive immigration reform looked weak. I completely disagree." —A cautiously optimistic Chuck Schumer last night.

"What has become increasingly clear is that we can no longer wait to fix our broken immigration system, which Democrats and Republicans alike agree doesn’t work.” —A much more motivated President Obama last night.

"There is not a chance that immigration is going to move through the Congress. You cannot do a serious piece of legislation of this size, with this difficulty, in this environment." —Wet blanket House Minority Leader John Boehner last night.

"Certainly that process should be in motion this year, and if we can get it done this year, we should get it done this year." —David Axelrod this morning.

Great, so we're all in agreement?