Cops Livid at Being Barred From Shooting to Kill

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Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Last week, a bill turned up in the State Assembly that would adjust the portion of the state penal code that allows cops to shoot criminals to kill if the officers feel their own lives, or the lives of others, are in danger. Called the "minimum force bill," it would require police to shoot suspects carrying guns in the arm or leg rather than a lethal location like the chest or head. In other words, with the "intent to stop, rather than kill." According to the Post, this bill was drafted with Sean Bell's 2006 shooting death at the hands of cops in mind. While this kind of maneuver works all the time on Law & Order, in real life, cops are pissed about this policy change. "These are split-second, spontaneous events — and officers have to make a full assessment in a fraction of a second," Detectives Endowment Association president Michael Paladino told the Post. "It is not realistic, and it exists only in cartoons. It's moronic and would create two sets of rules in the streets if there is a gunfight ... I don't know of any criminal who doesn't shoot to kill. They are not bound by any restrictions."

Cops furious at 'don't-kill' bill [NYP]