In Britain, Brown Out, Cameron In

By
Gordon Brown.

You know that feeling you get midway through the afternoon where you've had too much coffee in the morning, and you feel kind of dehydrated and really tired and a little headachey all at the same time, but you feel like another coffee will not only not help but will actually make it worse, like to the point where you get a queasy stomach, and the prospect of understanding even one concept or piece of information makes you want to cry a little bit except you know you are too dried out and weak to even produce tears of frustration and surrender? That is how we feel every single time we have to think about the British parliamentary elections. We're just going to give it to you straight: Former Labour prime minister Gordon Brown resigned today, voice cracking, outside of 10 Downing Street. Meanwhile, Tory leader David Cameron, whose party won the majority seats in the national election but who will need the alliance of the Liberal Democrats to actually form a government, was tapped as the new prime minister by the Queen (who still has a role in these things, apparently), even though it's not entirely known what form the conservative-liberal coalition government will actually take. The reason it makes sense is because there are no rules for how to handle this situation in the first place, but we're beginning to think maybe some Red Bull is the solution.

Cameron Is Great Britain's New Prime Minister [Sky News]
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown resigns [LAT]