Thousands of Russian Spies Could Still Be Among Us

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Worm-on-a-hook. Photo: Patrick McMullan

The New York Post caught up with former CIA operatives, who told the paper that the ten accused Russian spies taken into custody last week were probably not acting alone: "I would say there are a few thousand here," said Boris Korczak, a former double agent who worked for the CIA, spying on the KGB from 1973 to 1980. "There are more Russian spies here now than during the Cold War. [But] out of 1,000 spies, one or two will perform, will get access to our nuclear secrets." Korczak also shed some light on the enigmatic Anna Chapman (pictured), who, the Post reports, is being held in solitary confinement in a federal prison in Brooklyn, completely unaware of her media coverage: "Korczak believes that Chapman (real name: Anya Kuschenko) was likely schooled by the SVR — Russia's post-KGB intelligence agency — in the art of seduction," the Post reports. If that's not cinematic enough, some of this training took place in secret Russian cities that were exact replicas of American suburbs:


"During the Cold War, 'the Soviet Union had a number of schools that trained beautiful women in how to lure and satisfy powerful, rich, American men, sexually and intellectually,' [Korczak] said. 'They're called 'worm-on-a-hook' agents.' Some of these schools are located in small towns in the southern part of the country [that don't] appear on a map. They are exact replicas of American suburbs such as Chevy Chase, Md. ... Russian spies-in-training in these towns 'buy groceries at 7-Elevens, eat hamburgers at McDonald's, and watch American TV'"

Though it sounds like they might just get hooked on Slurpees and Glee and forget about the whole mission, Korczak said the Russian spies "are primarily after our technology," and "for America to break up into three different countries, to stop existing as a superpower.'"

''1000s' of Russian spies in U.S., surpassing Cold War record' [NYP]