Questioning America’s Intervention in Libya Is a Bipartisan Effort

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A new poll shows that Americans are fairly divided over military intervention in Libya. While 70 percent support a no-fly zone, only 54 percent back “air strikes not directly related to the no-fly zone that instead target the troops fighting the rebels,” which is what U.S., French, and British forces are doing. Still, that slim majority is a lot more support than what President Obama is getting from the political punditry. Liberals, conservatives, and moderates alike seem to overwhelmingly oppose the decision to intervene in Libya, and even supporters express grave doubts over some aspect of the operation.

Nothing Special About Libya:

Charles Krauthammer, Hugh Hewitt Show:

Richard Haass, Council on Foreign Relations:

Jeffrey Goldberg, Atlantic:

No Clear Objectives or Exit Strategy:

Ezra Klein, Washington Post:

George Will, Washington Post:

Chris Matthews, MSNBC:

Matt Yglesias, Think Progress:

James Fallows, Atlantic:

Too Costly:

Joe Klein, Swampland/Time:

Jim Manzi, National Review:

Too Late to Be Effective:

Niall Ferguson, Newsweek:

Josh Marshall, Talking Points Memo:

Could Incite Terrorism:

Glenn Greenwald, Salon:

Andrew Sullivan, Atlantic: