Will Officials Try to Deport DSK’s Accuser?

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Photo: Lucas Jackson/Reuters

It's a possibility, legally speaking, since she admitted that the initial account the Sofitel housekeeper gave police was incorrect in some details. Misleading a grand jury leaves her open to criminal charges — as do the falsehoods she told to get asylum in the States. Reuters, raising the question, explains that it's unlikely that an administrative court would actually pursue deportation of the woman, unless it becomes clear that she invented the case to make a financial profit. But given the comments the woman made on the phone to her boyfriend ("words to the effect of, ‘Don’t worry, this guy has a lot of money. I know what I’m doing,’” ), that's a legal course of action that it's impossible to dismiss out of hand yet. Any such move would, of course, be seen as the cruelest sort of piling-on — but the fact that it's now on the table as a matter of discussion speaks volumes about how far this case has shifted.

Tables could turn on Strauss-Kahn's accuser [Reuters]