Anders Breivik’s Manifesto May Include Code

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Bomb and terror suspect Anders Behring Breivik (red top) leaves the courthouse in a police car  in Oslo on July 25, 2011, after the hearing to decide his further detention.  Breivik will be held in solitary confinement for the first four weeks, with a ban on all communication with the outside world in a bid to aid a police investigation into his acts.
AFP Photo Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen / Aftenposten (Photo credit should read Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen/AFP/Getty Images)
Bomb and terror suspect Anders Behring Breivik (red top) leaves the courthouse in a police car in Oslo on July 25, 2011, after the hearing to decide his further detention. Breivik will be held in solitary confinement for the first four weeks, with a ban on all communication with the outside world in a bid to aid a police investigation into his acts. AFP Photo Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen / Aftenposten (Photo credit should read Jon-Are Berg-Jacobsen/AFP/Getty Images) Photo: AFP/2011 Aftenposten

The manifesto of Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Breikvik is just full of surprises. Apparently, Breivik — when he wasn't plagiarizing Ted Kaczynski — was including links to websites that don't seem to exist. This is an odd thing to do, even for a homicidal maniac. But a Norwegian computer expert claims that the faulty web addresses might actually be coded GPS coordinates. One of them points to a train station in Liverpool and others to "major sites across Europe." As the Telegraph reports, "Breivik emailed the 1500-page document to hundreds of online contacts" shortly before the explosion in Oslo. [Telegraph UK]