NYU Professor Goes Postal

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A U.S. Postal Service customer enters the Bayview Station on July 26, 2011 in San Francisco, California.  The U.S. Postal Service announced plans to cut up to 3,700 of its 32,000 post offices across the country as they seek ways to cut financial losses as mail volume dwindles.
A U.S. Postal Service customer enters the Bayview Station on July 26, 2011 in San Francisco, California. The U.S. Postal Service announced plans to cut up to 3,700 of its 32,000 post offices across the country as they seek ways to cut financial losses as mail volume dwindles. The Bayview Station is one of five in San Francisco that is being reviewed for closure. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Many people probably think post offices have gotten too much attention lately — after all, just days before the debt ceiling was set to expire, Congress spent some quality time naming post offices across the country. But one NYU literature professor, Steve Hutkins, thinks the imminent closure of 4,300 unprofitable post offices is a tragedy worth fighting for. He's started a blog, Save the Post Office, where he obsessively updates a map of threatened branches. He even requested a leave of absence from his job to work on the blog. (Publish or they perish?)

Hutkins, who lives in a small Hudson Valley town where the local postal branch was on the chopping block, blames "greedy corporations" and outsourcing for the demise of the USPS's vitality. "The Robber Barons are stealing the post office from the American people," one recent post read. It's an argument that will probably appeal to American people who haven't been forced to wait in line at the post office lately.

Blogger Steve Hutkins fights Postal Service’s move to close 4,300 post offices [WP]