The Earthquake Bride Speaks

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A bride in her wedding dress runs from the courthouse in Lower Manhattan in  New York August 23, 2011.  One of the strongest earthquakes to strike the US east coast in decades rattled offices Tuesday in downtown Washington and caused panicked evacuations from skyscrapers as far away as New York. The Pentagon, the US Capitol and Union Station in the nation's capital were all evacuated after the 5.9-magnitude quake, which was shallow with its epicenter only 0.6 miles (one kilometer) underground. The disruption to cell phone services in the hour after the quake added to the sense of panic in a country preparing to mark the 10th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.
AFP PHOTO/TIMOTHY A.CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A bride in her wedding dress runs from the courthouse in Lower Manhattan in New York August 23, 2011. One of the strongest earthquakes to strike the US east coast in decades rattled offices Tuesday in downtown Washington and caused panicked evacuations from skyscrapers as far away as New York. The Pentagon, the US Capitol and Union Station in the nation's capital were all evacuated after the 5.9-magnitude quake, which was shallow with its epicenter only 0.6 miles (one kilometer) underground. The disruption to cell phone services in the hour after the quake added to the sense of panic in a country preparing to mark the 10th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. AFP PHOTO/TIMOTHY A.CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images) Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/2011 AFP

The day after the East Coast earthquake, newspapers were filled with pictures of one woman: Valeriya Shevchenko. She was the fully decked-out bride sprinting frantically through New York's City Hall Park shouting into her cell phone. At a time when most people greeted the natural event with a shrug and a laugh, the Getty Images picture of Shevchenko provided a dramatic contrast. It looked like she was running for her life, but turns out she was running for something better: love!

From the Post:

When a security officer said it was an earthquake, Shevchenko hitched up her new David's Bridal gown and took off running, veil flying behind, to find [her fiance] Grif. "They said they had stopped the train — and my husband was on the train," said Shevchenko. "I ran all the way to Chambers and Broadway in my wedding dress and with my long veil to make sure he was OK. I kept calling, but his phone was dead. I couldn't reach him. I was so worried!" When she reached the corner, Grif was emerging from the subway. "She was frantic," said Grif. "She was upset." "Then I saw him with flowers in a suit," said his bride. "And I thought he looked so handsome." After exchanging kisses in front of onlookers, the pair headed back to City Hall.

The pair ended up marrying that day. The only problem with the happiest day of their lives, the photos of which ended up in newspapers across the country? The fact that they'd been keeping the wedding a secret from their disapproving families.

'Earthquake bride' tells how she feared nuptials would be ruined [NYP]