Seventeen Cops Indicted in Ticket-Fixing Scandal

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NEW YORK - APRIL 06:  A New York City police officer stands on patrol on April 6, 2010 in New York City. Following a melee involving groups of youths around Times Square last Sunday evening, concern is growing that New York City may be witnessing a resurgence in crime. Crime is up while fewer officers are patrolling the streets due to budget cuts in the police department, with more officers assigned to terrorism related security details. Shootings in New York City are up 19 percent and murders up 22 percent over the same period last year. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - APRIL 06: A New York City police officer stands on patrol on April 6, 2010 in New York City. Following a melee involving groups of youths around Times Square last Sunday evening, concern is growing that New York City may be witnessing a resurgence in crime. Crime is up while fewer officers are patrolling the streets due to budget cuts in the police department, with more officers assigned to terrorism related security details. Shootings in New York City are up 19 percent and murders up 22 percent over the same period last year. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Photo: Spencer Platt/2010 Getty Images

As expected, a Bronx grand jury indicted seventeen cops involved in the ticket-fixing scandal now gripping the city's police force — among them were eight delegates of the city's largest police union. "They'll have an opportunity to turn themselves in next week," a source close to the case told the Daily News. "We knew it was coming, but it's hard to swallow," said a police officer close to several of the men indicted. "When you take this job, you don't ever think you're going to be on the other end." But allegations are already surfacing that some higher-ups are being protected; defense lawyers plan to reveal the names of supervisors and chiefs who the officers said told them to fix tickets, a line of questioning Bronx prosecutors apparently wouldn't touch. [NYDN]