Mitt Romney’s Involuntary Political Celibacy

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NORTH LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 06:  Former Massachusetts Gov. and Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney speaks about his plan to increase jobs and boost the U.S. economy at McCandless International Trucks, Inc. September 6, 2011 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Romney, who won the GOP presidential caucuses in Nevada in 2008, is introducing his plan two days ahead of President Barack Obama's scheduled jobs proposal speech to Congress.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
NORTH LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 06: Former Massachusetts Gov. and Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney speaks about his plan to increase jobs and boost the U.S. economy at McCandless International Trucks, Inc. September 6, 2011 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Romney, who won the GOP presidential caucuses in Nevada in 2008, is introducing his plan two days ahead of President Barack Obama's scheduled jobs proposal speech to Congress. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) Photo: Ethan Miller/2011 Getty Images

Mitt Romney keeps emphasizing his relative lack of governing experience, and in each telling his political virginity gets a bit more pure than in the last. At last week's presidential debate, he declared, "I spent my life in the private sector, not in government." Today, Romney went further:


“Why am I in it? It’s not the next step of my career, by the way,” he said when asked why he’s running for president. “I don’t have a political career.”

I believe Jonathan Last put it best: "Mitt Romney would have been a career politician too, if only voters would have let him." The man lost a Senate race in 1994, eked out a win for governor in 2002, abandoned his office in 2006 when polls showed him trailing, and lost a presidential race in 2008, from which he's been running continuously since.

Romney doesn't have a political career in the same sense that William Hung doesn't have a music career. It's not because he's above it.