The Post Office Goes Negative

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A U.S. Postal Service customer enters the Bayview Station on July 26, 2011 in San Francisco, California.  The U.S. Postal Service announced plans to cut up to 3,700 of its 32,000 post offices across the country as they seek ways to cut financial losses as mail volume dwindles.
A U.S. Postal Service customer enters the Bayview Station on July 26, 2011 in San Francisco, California. The U.S. Postal Service announced plans to cut up to 3,700 of its 32,000 post offices across the country as they seek ways to cut financial losses as mail volume dwindles. The Bayview Station is one of five in San Francisco that is being reviewed for closure. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In an effort to revamp its own floundering business model, the United States Post Office is unveiling a smear campaign against e-mail. They're releasing a set of ads that emphasize the possibility of digital hacking, reports theWashington Post.


“A refrigerator has never been hacked,” an announcer says in the first message as an actress pins a paper bill to her fridge.

In the other ad, a smiling letter carrier is seen walking her route while an announcer reminds viewers that hand-delivered messages ensure that “important letters and information don’t get lost in thin air, or disappear with a click.”

Yeah, nothing ever gets lost in the mail. And there is nothing more secure than sticking a paper envelope in a small, unlocked box in front of a house and walking away, after all.

With historic losses looming, Postal Service launches new ad campaign [WaPo]