A Few People May Have to Die Before You Can Get Your Work Into The New Yorker

By
T. Coraghessan Boyle. Photo: Patrick McMullen

For writers, getting published in The New Yorker is notoriously difficult to achieve, and even celebrated authors face rejection. So at David Remnick’s New Yorker Festival party on Saturday night, regular contributor T. Coraghessan Boyle told us how he broke into the storied title.

“Well, here’s the way it is: The good news is that editors die,” Boyle cheerfully told us at the party at Andaz 5th Avenue. “So the old regime, they never wanted me, I was too outré, I was too outrageous for them. They all died off, and the new regime, starting with Tina Brown and now David, they love me, and so I love them. It’s very simple. So, you know, I publish here a lot now, and have for the last twenty years.”

So, keep your chin up, frustrated writers. Someday those editors who keep rejecting your work will die. Just "stick with it" until they do, Boyle advises. Courtney Love, take note.