Moments in the Life of Newt Gingrich and Their Historical Equivalents

Republican White House hopeful Newt Gingrich speaks to a group of supporters at a grocery store in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, on December 20, 2011. Gingrich barnstormed the key state of Iowa Tuesday, ripping his rivals' attack ads and declaring himself the best candidate to beat US President Barack Obama. Scarcely two weeks before Iowans cast the first votes in the party's nominating contest, Gingrich has been asking his supporters here to help him fight back as the barrage has battered his once-surging poll numbers. AFP Photo/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
This one random time Gingrich said something = Gettysburg Address Photo: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Last week, Newt Gingrich failed to secure a spot on the ballot for Virginia's March 6 presidential primary — an embarrassing setback for his campaign, but also a setback not unprecedented in American history, as campaign director Michael Krull noted on Facebook on Saturday:

Newt and I agreed that the analogy is December 1941: We have experienced an unexpected set-back, but we will re-group and re-focus with increased determination, commitment and positive action. Throughout the next months there will be ups and downs; there will be successes and failures; there will be easy victories and difficult days - but in the end we will stand victorious.

In short,  the Gingrich campaign is comparing its inability to meet Virginia's ballot requirements with Pearl Harbor. A Hoekstraian fit of self-important hyperbole? No. Since all moments in the life of Newt Gingrich carry with them an inherent gravity and momentousness, they can only be accurately compared to world-defining historical events. Indeed, yesterday, Gingrich released a video subtly comparing his campaign to the colonists' quest for freedom in the Revolutionary War. Here's a snippet:

Other Gingrich milestones and their equivalents throughout history: