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NYU Is Battling a Sexual-Harassment Scandal

New York University banners hang from a building in New York, U.S., on Monday, April 5, 2010. New York University will face financial hurdles and a fight with Greenwich Village preservationists as it tries to take over more space and compete harder with uptown rival Columbia University. Photographer: Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Everyone just needs to take a cold shower. New York University administrator Stephanie Bonadio claims in a new lawsuit that she lost her job when she accused her boss of sexual harassment. Bonadio says she was given a promotion within NYU's Schack Institute for Real Estate, but while at dinner discussing it with the dean, James Stuckey, "He grabbed her hand and ...without her consent, he forcibly placed her hand on his crotch and his erect penis," according to the lawsuit. The schools says Bonadio still has her job, but Stuckey, who no longer works for the institution, has had problems like this before. 

According to the lawsuit, Bonadio reported the incident only to find that her position "no longer existed and there was no specific job at NYU into which she could be placed." NYU spokesman John Beckman disputes this: "The allegation that the university would punish someone for reporting sexual harassment is entirely false," he said. "She continues to have a job and we have urged her to return to work."

Stuckey, on the other hand, does not have a job at the university. Soon after the alleged incident, he resigned from NYU citing "health reasons." He also quit working for the Bloomberg administration's Public Design Commission around the same time.

Four years prior, Stuckey ditched the Atlantic Yards development firm Forest City Ratner Cos. after he allegedly "took all of his subordinates to a club and then called a number of women employees into a private room, where he had them sit on his lap as though he were Santa Claus." A source told the New York Post, "There’s a pattern of this behavior. He’s a very competent guy, technically speaking. But his historical Achilles heel is this stuff.” Sometimes seeming like a huge creep overrides the talent part.

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Photo: Bloomberg/Bloomberg