Obama Still Muslim, Report Southern Republicans

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WHEAT RIDGE, CO - NOVEMBER 21:  A detail of a billboard lampooning President Barack Obama as a Mulsim stands over a used car lot on November 21, 2009 in Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Dealership owner Phil Wolf paid $2,500 to have the sign painted, and it has sparked controversy since it was put up the day before. Wolf, 57, said the dealership received more than a thousand calls from throughout the U.S. and Canada in a single day, both in support and against the sign. "We've had death threats. We had people call and say they were going to firebomb the place last night," he said, adding that local police provided overnight security outside the dealership because of the threats. Wolf, a supporter of the "birther" movement, questions President Obama's citizenship. "We've got to recall our country, the election," he said. This guy (Obama), is illegal." He also blamed the President for the massacre at Ft. Hood. "The cavalier attitude taken by Mr. Obama towards the enemy within us is absolutely horrible. If I had a snake in the house, I would kill it," Wolf said. Several left-leaning advocacy groups have called on the public to boycott the auto dealership. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Photo: John Moore/2009 Getty Images

It has been a while since the question of President Obama's religion -- his true religion, maybe the religion he or his "church" don't want you to know about -- has been on the national agenda. And the upcoming Alabama and Mississippi primaries are an opportune time to raise it, since Republicans from Alabama and Mississippi are a discerning bunch and especially apt to see through the president's tissue of lies.

PPP asks Republicans in Alabama, "Do you think Barack Obama is a Christian or a Muslim, or are you not sure?" Guess how many say Christian? 14%! Among the remaining 86%, "Muslim" slightly leads "not sure," 45%-41%. ("Not sure" may by the demographic Rick Santorum is reaching out to when he accuses Obama of peddling a "phony theology.")

But the Alabama Republicans are a thoroughly trusting lot in comparison with their Mississippi brethren. Among Mississippi Republicans, just 12% say Christian, 52% say Muslim, and 36% aren't sure.

The poll also finds that two-thirds of the Republicans in both states do not believe in evolution. Two-thirds of Alabama Republicans also believe interracial marriage ought to be legal, compared with 54% of Mississippi Republicans. Progress!