Jamie Dimon Thinks the New York Times Hates Banks

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James "Jamie" Dimon, chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co., speaks at a conference on global capital markets competitiveness hosted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 30, 2011. Dimon said cutting debt for home borrowers isn't the solution to the U.S. mortgage crisis. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Photo: Bloomberg/2011 Bloomberg

For a newspaper columnist, it's standard to weave in personal anecdotes that somehow relate to the events of the day. To hear Joe Nocera tell it, JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon practically did his job for him — almost too perfectly — with a little burst of rich-guy Tourette's:

A few months ago, I was standing in a crowded elevator when Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase, stepped in. When he saw me, he said in a voice loud enough for everyone to hear: “Why does The New York Times hate the banks?”

Nocera doesn't mention how he answered, but Dimon can now read for himself.