Three Arrested in News Corp. Investigation Ahead of More Murdoch Testimony

By
In this handout photograph provided by News International, Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, reviews the first edition of The Sun On Sunday as it comes off the presses on February 25, 2012 in Broxbourne, England. Around 3 million copies of 'The Sun On Sunday', the first ever Sunday edition of News Corporation's daily newspaper 'The Sun', are due to go on sale on Sunday February 26, 2012.
Photo: Handout/2012 News International (NI Group Ltd)

News Corp.'s own Management & Standards Committee turned over the information that led to the arrest today of the Sun's royal editor Duncan Larcombe, one of three people taken into custody in connection with the ongoing British bribery probe. That brings the total to 45 arrests stemming from the three simultaneous investigations into phone hacking, computer hacking, and paying off police and public officials. Criminal charges could be next.

On Tuesday, James Murdoch will appear again before a judicial inquiry to be asked, but not necessarily answer, questions about the still-metastasizing media scandal. He will be followed on Wednesday and Thursday by his father, Rupert Murdoch, as the guest of honor at the ethics hearing. Legislators hope to publish a report centering around phone hacking, one that's expected to be critical of News Corp., by May 1.

Prosecutors said yesterday that they're also looking into filing the first criminal charges in the News Corp. case after the Metropolitan Police turned over files on four journalists and seven other people. Rumor has it that former News of the World editor Rebekah Brooks, herself arrested twice, is among those that could face charges.