Mayor Bloomberg: Police Should Strike Until Public Pushes for Gun Control

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One of the few points that President Obama and Mitt Romney agree on is that they're both determined not to let gun control become an issue in the election, despite Friday's theater shooting in Colorado. However, their attempts to dodge the issue have only emboldened Mayor Bloomberg, who was rather bold to start with. After warming up on Monday's Morning Joe, Bloomberg ended the day by suggesting on Piers Morgan Tonight that law enforcement should take a drastic stand on the issue. "I don't understand why the police officers across this country don't stand up collectively and say we're going to go on strike," Bloomberg said. "We're not going to protect you unless you, the public, through your legislature, do what's required to keep us safe."

Earlier, Bloomberg said, "I think there is a perception among the political world that the NRA has more power than the American people. I don't believe that." However, there's evidence that the NRA isn't the only impediment to passing stricter gun laws. The New York Times reports that support for gun control has hit a new low. An October Gallup poll found that gun control laws were less popular among people of all political persuasions, and for the first time a majority (53 percent) opposed banning semiautomatic guns and assault rifles. Representative Peter King told the paper, “The majority of American people are very attached to their guns. They look on any attempt to regulate or control them as an infringement."

While things would likely change in the event of a massive police uprising, it seems the biggest hurdle for Mayor Bloomberg and those who support his position on guns isn't convincing people that they have the power to stand up to the NRA. The American people need to be convinced that they should back restrictions on their right to bear arms, despite the Founding Fathers' well-documented thoughts on 100-round magazines of ammunition.