SEAL Shares Secrets New Details on Bin Laden’s Killing With 60 Minutes

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CBS News aired its full 60 Minutes interview Sunday night with former Navy SEAL Mark Owen (who's been identified as Matt Bissonnette), who penned the recently published book No Easy Day about the raid on Osama bin Laden's Pakistan compound. Bissonnette covered much of the book's material (the dissemination of which has drawn the ire of the Pentagon, which alleges it contains confidential information). Speaking with Scott Pelley, Bissonnette described how both Osama bin Laden and his son, Khalid, ultimately fell after they poked their heads out of doors in the compound:

[Bissonnette's comrade] literally whispers, not amped up, not yelling, not anything. He whispers, "Hey, Khalid. Khalid." He whispers Khalid's name. Doesn't know if it's Khalid or not. Khalid literally looks back around the edge of the hall. And he shoots him. What was Khalid thinking at that time? Look around the corner. Curiosity killed the cat. I guess Khalid too.

Bissonnette also shares more details on the killing of Osama bin Laden, revealing that he and another SEAL shot him "a handful of times" after he was initially wounded. Per CBS News:

Scott Pelley: He's still moving?

Mark Owen: A little bit. But you couldn't see his arms. Couldn't see his hands. So, he could've had something. Could've had a hand grenade or something underneath his chest.

Of course, there are other reasons that one might want to take a few extra shots at bin Laden, but Bissonnette says they didn't even know it was him. "You know, everybody thinks it was, like, you know it's him," Bissonnette explains. "To us, at that time, it could have been anybody. Maybe this was another brother. Maybe this is a bodyguard. Maybe, it doesn't matter. The point is to just continue clearing."

As for Bissonnette's potential legal problems with his former bosses at the Pentagon, he insists that he's done nothing wrong. "I'm not talking secrets. I'm not talking tactics," he says. "I don't even get into any of that stuff. But I really try and give the reader a sense of what it's like to be there." Just to be clear, Bissonnette didn't reveal any secrets in the interview, he just shared some vivid and detailed descriptions that the Pentagon would prefer the public didn't know.