Scalia Defends Comparison Between Bans on Homosexuality and Murder

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WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 05:  Supreme Court Justices Antonin Scalia testifies during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee October 5, 2011 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The justice testified on "Considering the Role of Judges Under the Constitution of the United States."  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Photo: Alex Wong/2011 Getty Images

While speaking at Princeton University on Monday, Antonin Scalia provided a reminder of why some gay rights proponents are nervous about the Supreme Court's decision to take on Prop. 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act next year. During the question and answer session, freshman Duncan Hosie asked Scalia why he's equated laws that ban homosexuality with those that outlaw bestiality and murder in his legal writings. "It's a form of argument that I thought you would have known, which is called the 'reduction to the absurd,'" snapped Scalia. "If we cannot have moral feelings against homosexuality, can we have it against murder? Can we have it against other things?" He added dryly, "I'm surprised you aren't persuaded." It seems Scalia hasn't changed his stance on homosexuality, or being cantankerous with young and old alike.