‘Cannibal Cop’ Credits Bondage Fetish to Cameron Diaz in The Mask

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THE MASK, from left: Cameron Diaz, Jim Carrey, 1994. ©New Line Cinema / Everett Collection
Photo: null/New Line Cinema/courtesy Everett/Everett Collection

Just when you think the case of accused "cannibal cop" Gilberto Valle can't get any more strange, his lawyers bring Jim Carrey into it. According to the NYPD officer's public attorneys, who are going with the "just a weird fetish" defense, Valle's "pattern of arousal appears to have originated with a scene in the movie, The Mask, in which Cameron Diaz pretends to be abducted and bound." For those among us who were not kids in the mid-nineties, that's the one in which Carrey's face is green and he does a lot of dancing. Behold the mostly not-sexy clip in question, but beware that it may eventually make you want to cook and rape women, or at least chat about it online:

The 29-year-old Valle would have been about 10 when The Mask came out, which sounds about right as far as formative sexual intrigue goes. Based on the court filing, Valle got into porn in high school "and was particularly interested in bondage websites," eventually discovering "darker fetish Web sites, including 'Muki's Kitchen,' which was his gateway into cannibalism pornography" in college.

Valle's online conspiring to kidnap and cook women does read a bit differently if you imagine he's having some weird form of cybersex, not plotting to become a cannibalistic serial killer, but that's up to the jury to decide.

In selecting jurors, the defense submitted three graphic images of tied-up women being prepared like food, discovered on Valle's hard drive, in order to "screen out people too squeamish to deal with the testimony and evidence at his upcoming trial," the New York Post reports. The tabloid also petitioned to make the pictures public, because journalism.

Gawker has all of them (NSFW!), including a cartoon with a speech bubble that reads, "Well Karyn you seem to be cooking up quite nicely ... " The woman's face in the drawing is blocked out, though, the Post reports, "because Valle or someone else superimposed the face 'of a real victim,' prosecutors alleged in court earlier this week." Screening a scene from The Mask in court should be a bit easier considering it's rated PG-13.