Arkansas Lawmaker Jason Rapert May Be Slightly Less of a Bigot, Is Still a Liar

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Jason Rapert is just an Islamophobe and a liar. Get it right, people.

It appears that Arkansas state senator Jason Rapert might not have been referring to black people when he said at a tea party rally in 2011 that "we're not gonna allow minorities to run roughshod over what you people believe in!"

So what did he mean by "minorities"?  A separate portion of the video (see below) sheds light on this (again emphasis mine).  Before the above remark, Rapert addressed the case in which the Arkansas Supreme Court overturned the ban of gay foster parents saying …

Here in Arkansas we tried to do something about our values on that. We said ‘You know what. Where we have foster children, we want them to be in a good home with a mommy and a daddy.’ Do ya’ll think that’s alright? Well, right here the other day a bunch of your Supreme Court Justices just struck it down – said your vote don’t count. I am here to tell you that we are a people who is ruled by a majority in this country. And I am tired of minority interests that are running roughshod over you and me.

In fairness to ourselves and to everyone else who accused Rapert of racism, the reference to fighting "minorities" came directly after Rapert implied that President Obama was a secret Muslim who espoused un-American values. Keeping track of all of Rapert's various bigotries is not easy.

On Twitter over the weekend, Rapert also defended his claim — which we disproved last week — that Obama invited Muslims to the White House for a "little Ramadan supper" but refused to attend the National Prayer Breakfast:

The "proof" that Rapert links to is an article that reports, correctly, that Obama did not hold a White House event to commemorate the National Day of Prayer. This is not the same thing as the National Prayer Breakfast. Rapert is either a liar or has pretty serious reading-comprehension issues.

Because we doubt Rapert has figured out how to Google things and/or read the information that Googling produces, we will do him the favor of pointing out that Obama's decision to merely issue a proclamation for the National Day of Prayer is not at all unusual. Though George W. Bush held a National Day of Prayer event at the White House each year, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush only held one a piece, and Bill Clinton held zero, according to Politifact.