If They Had Called Sandy a Hurricane When It Hit, Would Things Have Been Different?

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The New York City skyline and Hudson River are seen from Hoboken, NJ as Hurricane Sandy approaches on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)
Photo: Charles Sykes/AP

When Sandy finally hit land it wasn't technically a hurricane, it was a post-tropical cyclone. And the National Hurricane Center thinks that because it issued a hurricane warning and then downgraded the storm, the gravity of the situation was lost on some people. "The center currently lacks the ability to convey the severity of a storm without being hemmed in by the technical definition of a hurricane," one forecaster told the New York Times. But continuing to call it a hurricane "would have utterly destroyed the credibility of the agency in the long run." Maybe they should make "superstorm" an official thing.