Goldman Sachs’s Magic Twins Are Getting Their Wellness On

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Paul, not Peter (I think)

For years, people have been laboring under the assumption that Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, the plucky Harvard rowers who got millions of dollars in a legal settlement over Facebook's founding, are the nation's most handsome and successful business twins. Those people are wrong.

That title actually belongs to Peter and Paul Scialla, a pair of debonair twin brothers (old photo here) who both ascended to the top ranks at Goldman Sachs. Paul, who was Goldman's co-head of U.S. interest rate products cash trading, and Peter, who was head of U.S. volatility trading, were both named to Goldman's partnership in 2008. And now, because brothers travel together, they've both left the firm to focus on their side business — a Deepak Chopra–approved wellness company.

A source tells us that both Scialla twins left Goldman last week to focus full time on Delos Living, a wellness company they started in their spare time. The company helps build healthy living spaces that feature all kinds of hoity-toity wellness technologies, in places like the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, and is advised by people like former Congressman Dick Gephardt and real-estate mega-agent Dolly Lenz.

It's rare, but not unheard of, for Goldman partners to leave the firm once anointed. But it looks like the Sciallas have been silent partners in Delos for several years. Neither brother appears on the company's website, but a trademark search shows that Paul has owned the rights to "Delos Living" since 2011.

Paul, who is known as "Spider" within Goldman, has had a rough last few weeks at the firm, partly thanks to us. (Sorry, Paul!) Earlier this month, we posted some Instagram photos from Goldman's newly resurrected Partner Ball, which showed Paul and his date, a model and former cocktail waitress named Shannon Kelly, enjoying themselves at the black-tie affair.

Photo: shannonkelly926/Instagram

We're told that the emergence of the photos got Scialla mocked by his fellow mortgage traders, but had nothing to do with his decision to leave 200 West Street for healthier work with his brother.