Park Group Won’t Make Brooklyn Meadow a Photographer’s Memorial

NEW YORK - OCTOBER 19:  The Brooklyn Bridge is viewed from the shore at a park October 19, 2009 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. A new report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECP) finds that rising sea levels due to global warming threatens some of the world’s major cities. According to the report, seas are rising twice as fast as recently projected threatening such sea level cities as New York, Miami, London, Tokyo, Mumbai and Amsterdam. World leaders are scheduled to meet in Copenhagen, Denmark in December for the UN-sponsored climate-change conference where issues such as rising sea levels are to be discussed.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Photo: Spencer Platt/2009 Getty Images

A contest to name a meadow near the Brooklyn Bridge got some local media attention over the last week or so as a movement gained steam to make it into a memorial for Chris Hondros, the Brooklyn Heightsbased Getty photographer killed in Libya in 2011. It was a nice idea, but for the Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy it was not only a non-starter, it was a contest killer. The group canceled the call for names after Hondros became the clear frontrunner. "We’re keenly aware that there are so many deserving and special Brooklyn residents to memorialize, and it felt like naming the lawn for one person isn’t fully representative of that," executive director Nancy Weber told the New York Times.

As Photo District News points out, lots of Brooklyn parks are named for individuals. The ones mentioned — McCarren Park, Maria Hernandez Park, J.J. Byrne Playground, and the Lt. Federico Narvaez Tot Lot — were named for city and state workers. But McGolrick Park, in Greenpoint, was named for Monsignor Edward J. McGolrick, the pastor of St. Cecilia's Church. That won't be happening for Hondros, but Webster told PDN the conservancy would contact the Chris Hondros Fund “to explore other ways to honor his memory.”