Old White Man Mocks Christine Quinn’s Bulimia, Alcoholism

By
New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn
speaks to the media at the opening of the Workforce1 Veterans Career Center on July 31, 2012 in New York City.  The center will offer area veterans assistance in their job search, help with resumes and classes on how to perfect the interview process. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for all veterans in June was 7.4 percent.  NEW YORK, NY - JULY 31:  New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn
speaks to the media at the opening of the Workforce1 Veterans Career Center on July 31, 2012 in New York City.  The center will offer area veterans assistance in their job search, help with resumes and classes on how to perfect the interview process. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for all veterans in June was 7.4 percent.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images2012 Getty Images

In yesterday's front-page New York Times story, in which City Council Speaker and mayoral favorite Christine Quinn first revealed her struggles with an eating disorder and alcoholism around the time of her mother's death, the reporter Kate Taylor noted, delicately, that the candidate reached out to the paper with the story herself, "as her aides try to soften her often rough-edged political image and build a campaign that draws heavily on her personal appeal to women." Okay, fair enough, but it's not like she's making it up. And to insinuate as much would belittle the importance of a woman in power speaking candidly about issues affecting women everywhere, including the author of the story, right?

And yet … "Ha ha ha," fake-laughed former Republican Senator Al D'Amato last night on NY1, from his place of privilege. "Ha ha ha. Oh, gimme a break."

The rest of the "Wiseguys" panel of New York political insiders, including former governors Eliot Spitzer and David Paterson, grew visibly uncomfortable and the host shot back, "Not a laughing matter, Senator." The 75-year-old D'Amato did not take the hint.

"I'm crying," he continued, taking on a whiny Quinn voice. "My campaign is suffering. I'm going down." D'Amato is supporting Bill Thompson for mayor, although such a display isn't exactly helpful. "It's a bunch of bunk," D'Amato added, in conclusion. Spitzer and Paterson, meanwhile, both defended Quinn, calling it an "intensely sympathetic and humanizing story," politics aside, and for a moment, the generation gap looked a million miles wide.