Bill de Blasio’s Meeting With Mayor Bloomberg, in Photos

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The morning after his trouncing of Joe Lhota, mayor-elect Bill de Blasio sat down at City Hall for a chat with mayor-right-now Michael Bloomberg, whose legacy De Blasio forcefully rejected throughout the campaign. According to these completely fabricated captions to various photos, the meeting didn't go well at all.

"And that's reason No. 8 you're incapable of governing this city. Reason No. 9 ..."

New York City Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio, left, joins Mayor Michael Bloomberg for a meeting in the "Bull Pen," the mayor's main City Hall office, on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013, in New York. De Blasio, the city’s public advocate, defeated Joseph J. Lhota, a former chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, by a margin of about 49 percentage points, with 99 percent of the vote counted, to become the city's next mayor.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
Photo: Bebeto Matthews/Corbis

"I heard you like to refer to me as an 'evil racist midget.' Don't deny it."

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets with Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio on November 6, 2013 at City Hall, the morning after De Blasio was elected New York Citys first Democratic mayor in two decades. De Blasio won a stunning landslide victory of 73.3 percent of votes cast compared to 24.3 percent for his Republican rival Joe Lhota, according to results from 99 percent of polling stations. But of the 4.6 million registered voters in New York only 1.02 million actually cast their vote, based on those results.    AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY CLARY        (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Photo: TIMOTHY CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

"Tell me the truth — you're just jealous of Dante's Afro."

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets with Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio on November 6, 2013 at City Hall, the morning after De Blasio was elected New York Citys first Democratic mayor in two decades. De Blasio won a stunning landslide victory of 73.3 percent of votes cast compared to 24.3 percent for his Republican rival Joe Lhota, according to results from 99 percent of polling stations. But of the 4.6 million registered voters in New York only 1.02 million actually cast their vote, based on those results.    AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY CLARY        (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Photo: TIMOTHY CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

"Mike? Mike? Are you just ignoring me now? Mike?"

(via @erinmdurkin) Photo: Erin Durkin / Twitter