Restrictive Texas Abortion Law Reinstated After Just Three Days

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AUSTIN, TX - JULY 01: Supporters of Texas women's right to reproductive decisions rally at the Texas State capitol on July 1, 2013 in Austin, Texas. This is first day of a second legislative special session called by Texas Gov. Rick Perry to pass an restrictive abortion law through the Texas legislature. The first attempt was defeated after opponents of the law were able to stall the vote until after first special session had ended.
Photo: Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Texans did not have much time to get used to a judge's ruling Monday that struck down a key provision of the state's restrictive abortion law before another court on Thursday reinstated it. The decision by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals makes it a requirement once more that abortion providers obtain admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their clinic. On Monday, U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel overturned that part of the law, which Wendy Davis famously filibustered, saying it unfairly restricted abortion access. But the Fifth Circuit said the provision would stay in place while a lawsuit from Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, and others, went ahead. So for now, Texas is back to having some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country.