De Blasio Received a Letter Threatening ‘Nuclear Attack’ in NYC

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New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio attends a press conference to announce the city will not appeal a judge's ruling that the police tactic "Stop-and-Frisk" is unconstitutional, which the judge had ruled over last summer, on January 30, 2014 in in the Brownsville neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York City.  DeBlasio, who campaigned for mayor saying he would stop "stop-and-frisk," stands in stark contrast to his predecessor, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who staunchly defended the tactic.
Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

On Friday we learned that envelopes containing suspicious powder were sent to several hotels near MetLife Stadium and Rudy Giuliani's office. Thankfully, the substance was found to be harmless, but on Sunday, Bill de Blasio mentioned that, by the way, he also received a threatening letter, and his suggested a "nuclear attack" on New York was imminent. The letter, which was addressed to the mayor's Park Slope home but opened in City Hall on Friday, did not contain any powder. It's unclear when the attack would have taken place, but the letter referenced the "Treason Bowl." "I have absolute faith that the NYPD is handling this and every other threat very well and very professionally, and I’m not going to comment on it," De Blasio told reporters. There haven't been any reports about an attempted attack on the city tonight, so you may continue worrying about having no blue cheese dressing for the remainder of your wings.