People Still Eager to Move to Overcrowded, Ridiculously Expensive Place

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Photo: Konstantin Sergeyev

A report released by the United States Census Bureau show that the number of people in New York has increased for the third consecutive year, with the 73,000 people who came here from abroad comprising the bulk of the newcomers. (24,000 of them settled in Queens county (which is just Queens), making its population of foreign immigrants the third-highest in the nation.) Meanwhile, the 67,000 folks who left represented "a continuing decline in the loss of migrants to other states," says the New York Times. Those figures, combined with births and deaths, have pushed the population "by more than 61,000," which means there are now over 8.4 million stories in the naked city.

Overall, there are now 2.8 percent more people living in New York than there were in 2010, despite the "slowdown" attributed to the lingering effects of the recession. Dr. Joseph J. Salvo, the director of the Department of City Planning's population division, told the Times that it's "the first time since the late 1940s or early 1950s that we've had a net migration near zero or positive." Brookings Instiution demographer Dr. William H. Frey explained that, "The huge city migration losses in previous years were a result of metro-wide losses to the Sun Belt and continued suburbanization."

Basically, old people peaced out to Florida and families headed for places where they could have a yard for the kids, so "'Many young people' who might otherwise move away,' are finding the city, including the outer boroughs, an attractive long-term home.'" Until they realize that there is a little bit of truth to this, that is.