The NYPD Can’t Stop Changes to Stop-and-Frisk

By
 Rev. Al Sharpton, center, walks with demonstrators during a silent march to end New York's "stop-and-frisk" program. On Monday Aug 12, 2013, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that the New York Police Department deliberately violated the civil rights of tens of thousands of New Yorkers with its contentious stop-and-frisk policy, and said an independent monitor is needed to oversee major changes.
Photo: Seth Wenig/Corbis

A federal judge today told five different police unions they can't stop broad changes to stop-and-frisk that Mayor de Blasio agreed to in a settlement earlier this year. The ruling opens the door for the NYPD to overhaul the practice that was ruled unconstitutional last August. In the 108-page ruling, federal Judge​​ Analisa Torres said the unions have "no significant protectable interests relating to the subject of the litigation that would warrant intervention."

And so ends the department's attempts to prevent stop-and-frisk reforms. Those changes, agreed to in January by the mayor and plaintiffs suing the city over what they said were illegal stop-and-frisks, include retraining officers, a new program that would put cameras on some officers, and an independent monitor to oversee the new process. Now they can finally go into effect.