First Rule of Bloomberg LP: You Do Not Talk About Bloomberg

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NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 18:  New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg pauses after speaking to the Economic Club of New York in what is being billed as his last major speech as Mayor of New York City on December 18, 2013 in New York City.  Bloomberg, who is down to his final two weeks in office after 12 years of running New York, leaves behind a city that has made great gains in development, crime reduction and tourism but is still nagged by a large number of both homeless and impoverished residents. Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio has promised to focus more on low income housing and easing the strain for poor and working class New Yorkers when he takes over on January 1, 2014.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Photo: Spencer Platt/2013 Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg just announced that he’s returning as CEO of Bloomberg LP, the company he founded, and the New York Times reports that he’s already “displeased a number of Bloomberg’s journalists.” Surprisingly, the issue isn’t the former mayor’s belief that bathroom breaks are for the weak. They’re upset that Bloomberg let the Times break the news about his new job, as company policy dictates that “Bloomberg News doesn’t originate stories about the company” or report on the “wealth or personal life” of its founder. Matthew Winkler, the editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News, explained that while most media companies report on themselves, it’s “an inherent conflict of interest and no outlet does it well.” Presumably, if any other Bloomberg LP employees want to compare their founder to God, they’re welcome to issue a press release.