Putin’s Hungry Tiger May Spoil His World Domination Partnership With China

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Photo: Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution

Goats in northeastern China have been showing up dead, with crushed skulls and puncture marks “the size of a human finger clearly visible.” This means there are two options: Either some tigers have been particularly hungry, or Wolverine has moved to China and developed a taste for goat tartare.

Unfortunately for wildlife-loving Russian leader Vladimir Putin (exhibit 1: cranes, exhibit 2: bears), it looks like the answer is the former. The president recently released three tigers back into the wild, and two of them have been tracked crossing into China earlier this year. One of those, Ustin, is the prime suspect in at least two goat murders.

And, while it’s not clear how upset Chinese officials are about the dead goats, international officials have been concerned that the endangered Siberian tigers may be targets for poachers, who can get up to $10,000 a body. Either way, it looks like the Russia-China economic partnership just hit a speed bump.